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Posts Tagged ‘Actemra’

Just a quick post. I have posted a poll on the blog’s Facebook Page asking what current Biologic Treatment people with Stills are currently taking, so that I can try and see which drugs are the most widely used in the treatment of Still’s Disease.

The poll here is slightly different, in that you can vote for more than one option, to give you the opportunity to record each Biologic drug you have tried, since I figured this might give us a broader spectrum to base results on.

You can take part in both if you wish!

NB. Please only vote on the poll if you do have a diagnosis of Still’s Disease, Adult Onset Still’s Disease or Systemic Juvenile Arthritis, thanks.

L

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Just a quick note to say that I sent my Rheumatologist a weekly update on my condition, which isn’t getting any better. My current joint count includes: both hips, but especially my left being painful and unstable, both knees being very swollen, sore and restricted, left elbow swollen, painful and very restricted, both shoulders painful with fluctuating levels of restriction, neck stiff and sore, left wrist and fingers starting to feel puffy and stiff and developing pins and needles through to that hand, both ankles feeling tight and the left side of my jaw quite painful and tender to touch. So, you can probably understand that my hopes for Tocilizumab ever working are slowly dwindlng away…

I said as much in my email to my Rheumatologist and was relieved that he feels we have given the current treatment combination enough time now and that he is looking into other options to see what we should try next. I have been on Tocilizumab for 6 months now; 4 in combination with Methotrexate and 2 with Ciclosporin. Blood test results have show significant improvement but my joints have definitely not; in fact, I am much worse now than when I started.  In his reply he stated that the next step will probably be a stronger anti-tnf drug; Enbrel worked for a long time, but I eventually formed antibodies against it. I know there have been a lot of advances in anti-tnf since then and so I am happy with this option.

I’m due for my next infusion on Friday and will see my Rheumatologist to discuss things further then and hopefully come away with a plan of action. I’m guessing I’ll at least have this last dose of Tocilizumab and then maybe we will start the application to fund something new. I also hope that they will be able to take some of this fluid off my joints, particularly my knees, to give me a bit more movement. Not being able to bend my knees or weightbear on my hips properly is certainly proving to be a challenge!

Until then, I’ll be doing some research of my own into the anti-tnf options available,

L

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So, December flew by and it was infusion time again. I woke up earlier than normal to get to the hospital on time and wasn’t feeling great at all. It took a lot of help and determination to get myself into the car as I was stiff, in pain and as weak as a kitten.

We arrived on the ward and the nurses noticed I was struggling straight away; I don’t even remember them fitting the cannula or taking my blood, but while taking my observations the Sister asked me how long I’d been feeling this way. I told her everything, she asked if I was feeling breathless and I explained that it wasn’t breathlessness exactly but a sense that I might forget to breathe if I didn’t make a conscious effort. I’m sure others have felt this too at times. She was obviously concerned and called my Rheumy straight away.

It wasn’t long after, that he came to see me; he asked if I felt awful in the usual way and I explained mainly as a Still’s flare but that I’d also experienced muscle weakness comparable to when my diagnosis was Dermatomysositis at 14. He examined my joints and said that he could feel the heat from them through my clothes, particularly my elbow and knee, which he injected with cortisone. Since there was no reason not to take Ciclosporin with the Tocilizumab and I’d responded well to it in the past, he decided to take me off Methotrexate and put me back on Ciclosporin at 300mg a day.

He also said he had spoken to a Paediatric Still’s specialist called Dr Helen Foster, who has lots of experience with Tocilizumab and had told him that it is not unusual for there to be an interval between test results and symptoms improving.  So I am still hopeful that this could be the winning combination and if I ever feel as good as my inflammation markers currently are (ESR of 8 and CRP less than 1 – both results the best we have ever seen for me) then I could end up feeling pretty fantastic in the near future. We just have to keep an eye on some of my other blood test results, as my WBC is low at 3.5 and neutrophils at 1.5. I don’t want a repeat of last year when Imuran caused Neutropenia and left me in an isolation room in hospital. Hopefully, this time round it has been the Methotrexate and not the Tocilizumab.

The last thing that we discussed was my recent neck pain and current hip trouble, which is agony. He had barely moved my right hip before I started yelping out in pain. It could be inflammation, or joint damage from the Still’s but he also mentioned something called Avascular Necrosis, which is when the bone tissue dies and can be caused by prolonged use of steroids. It has been fifteen years on Prednisolone without a break for me, plus the joint injections and occassional IV, so he sent me off for xrays of the hips and neck.

I was wheeled down to the xray department, where I struggled getting changed into a gown, getting up from lying on my back after the hip xrays and standing up for the neck ones. It made me realise just how much I have been relying on other people and on minimising what I do. Once we were back on the ward, I had a nap while we waited for the Tocilizumab. The infusion arrived just before 5.00pm and takes an hour to go through, it makes me feel warm but apart from that I have no reaction to the infusion itself. We left the hospital just after 6pm with my next appointment booked for the 2nd February, and knowing that my Rheumy would get in touch in between with my xray results.

So now I’m pooped and have that slightly overwhelmed feeling I get when having to take so much information in from hospital visits. I’ve probably said it before, but it makes things feel so much more real on days like today.

I’ll be good after a sleep,

L

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At my last Orencia infusion on the 15th September, Dr S and I came to the conclusion that it wasn’t helping the majority of my symptoms, plus my bloodwork was either getting worse or staying the same. The decision was made to switch to Tocilizumab (RoActemra) and I had my first infusion today.

It’s been an extremely long and tiring day. I arrived on the ward only to find it extremely busy with the chemo clinic, so there wasn’t a room available for me. Instead I had to sit in the waiting area, having the nurses take my observations (BP, Temp, Pulse rate etc) from there; thankfully, we managed to hijack a room to fit my cannula, take my bloodwork and then, later, to talk with the doctor but it seemed an even longer wait out there.

My consultant was away this week so I saw one of his registrars, since it was the first time I had received the drug. He went through things really well and I had a good chat to him about further treatment options; it’s always interesting to hear a different point of view. Firstly, he explained why Tocilizumab was a good treatment choice for me (Commence Science Lesson 1 as understood by yours truly):

When we have flu one of the things that makes us feel so unwell is an excess of a cytokine called IL-6. This cytokine plays a role in the production of CRP, which is also an inflammation marker in conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Still’s Disease. Tocilizumab is an Il-6 Inhibitor, which in layman’s terms means it ‘mops up’ any excess Il-6, preventing CRP production. Because my CRP levels are consistently high when the Still’s Disease is active, it suggests that I am producing too much Il-6, and so there should be plenty for the Tocilizumab to ‘mop up’, in theory making me feel better.

This sounds very promising but, of course, there is no guarantee.  He went on to say that if it didn’t work he felt it was good idea to return to the anti-tnf drugs because I had a really good response to Enbrel for a number of years (and so to Science Lesson 2).  The reason that it became less effective is because my body gradually started to produce antibodies against it, which is why a person usually takes Methotrexate alongside Enbrel and other anti-tnf – to stop the antibodies forming rather than to treat the disease.

I was on Cyclosporin alongside Enbrel, which is another immunosuppressant drug, but perhaps it didn’t do an adequate job preventing antibody production; then again, it did a good job keeping things at bay. He suggests trying one of the other anti-tnfs alongside Methotrexate, although he also mentioned another drug similar to Cyclosporin, called Tacrilomus, which I’ve only heard a bit about. This is the only oral DMARD that I haven’t tried and that isn’t a nice thought.

Anyway, after speaking with the registrar and a bit more waiting, it was eventually time to be hooked up to the Tocilizumab. Things went through fine for the first half an hour and I was happily chatting away to one of the nurses when I suddenly came over all lightheaded, hot and turned a fetching shade of red. The nurse went to fetch another nurse that looks after me and they took my obs again – BP was lower, temp higher and pulse rate 148 but within 10 minutes I started to feel better and the results returned to normal.

We went ahead with the whole infusion, which took an hour in total, and then I stayed for an hour afterwards to make sure I was okay. I’m still not sure what caused such a reaction but I did have a bit of a ‘moment’ during my first Orencia infusion, only not quite as dramatic. My heart rate was already up a bit when I arrived today (125) and I haven’t been feeling too good all week, but there have been no signs of infection in my wound or anywhere else.  Still, maybe there was something underlying that contributed to it and it’ll be a one off.

Unlike with Orencia, I am going straight into having Tocilizumab every four weeks and my next appointment is November 10th. The literature says that some people feel a benefit after only two weeks, so here’s hoping!

L

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