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Posts Tagged ‘Articles and Research’

I thought I’d post this article, as it sounds like promising research to me. Scientists claim to have found a protein that stops immune cells from going on a ‘rampage’ and destroying healthy joint & cartilage tissue.  Apparently, it is a lack of this protein that may cause the symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

When the scientist injected a form of this protein into an animal with RA presentation, its symptoms disappeared, so it looks like another type of treatment could be on the way in years to come.

Who knows, maybe one day they will finally find a universal treatment that helps every single case, rather than relying on the trial and error method of gaining control over the disease.

L

 

Edit: A similar article on the same subject can be found here.

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I started this blog at the beginning of June this year, with lots to say but not really sure if anybody would be interested in reading it.  I knew there were plenty of people out there with Still’s Disease, but finding them was a different matter – we tend to blend in with the RA crowd, or there is confusion regarding the interchangable term Systemic JIA.  Then slowly, but surely, more and more people found their way here, through links, facebook and search engines… and today we reached 1000 hits.

The Top Ten Posts so far have been:

  1. Home Page
  2. My Story
  3. A Slightly Better Day
  4. Still’s Disease
  5. Confused About Still’s Disease?
  6. Articles Section
  7. First Orencia / Abatacept Infusion
  8. Round Two
  9. Poor Veins For IVs Blood Tests
  10. Two Cortisone Shots Later

I hope that the information I post has been useful to some people; it is difficult to find info that corresponds directly to Still’s Disease rather than RA, but it is out there and I’ll keep on posting what I find.  My intention was always to use this blog as a stepping stone to creating a UK Still’s Disease website and I’m hoping to soon make that a reality, so watch this space.

Thank you for reading,

L

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This article outlines results from some recent studies into this question, which must be on the mind of many of us. It covers each of the non anti-TNF drugs individually, but the risk of cancer in each does not seem significantly greater than for people not treated with Biologics.  Of course, because these drugs are still relatively new, long-term effects have yet to be established and continued research is required. Still, it’s a promising start.

Edit: For some reason the above link doesn’t work for everyone, so I copied the article here.

Ps. The Guides for Diclofenac and Indometacin are now accessible from the Treatments tab.

L

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I was surprised to find six new articles about Still’s Disease in my inbox this morning, thanks to the drug Tocilizumab being approved in the treatment of children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.  This drug is being hailed as a wonder drug in the treatment of Still’s (sJIA), with patients so far showing a 90% increase in wellbeing; as these articles state, even children that were previously wheelchair bound have been given a new lease of life.  What I didn’t know, is that Tocilizumab is actually the first drug to be approved to specifially treat sJIA/Still’s.

The first article from the Daily Mirror tells of a young girl with sJIA, who was bullied for being in a wheelchair and was crippled by pain, even with Morphine, but is now leading a ‘normal’ life thanks to Tocilizumab; she talks about how it has literally transformed her life, which is what we all want.

The next article  from the Daily Mail is my particular favourite, since it features my Paediatric RD Eileen Baildam, who played a major part in the drug trials:

“Dr Eileen Baildam, consultant paediatric rheumatologist and triallist at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, has treated 12 children with the drug and seen them all make a remarkable recovery.  She said ‘These are very sick children, the disease affects every single joint in their bodies as well as heart and lungs. They can die from heart failure and other conditions if they don’t get treated. It’s much worse than rheumatoid arthritis in adults.”

The article goes on to say how two thirds of patients treated with Tocilizumab had a 70% improvement after just three month, with this increasing to a 90% improvement after a year of treatment, with little or no side effects.  The drug costs the same as similar biologic therapies available, but the NHS is currently assessing whether this will prove cost effective in the treatment of children.  Dr Baildam says:

 ‘I hope and expect it will be approved and I think it should be given to children as soon as they are diagnosed to limit the disability caused by this dreadful disease.’

And I would agree with this – surely in offering this drug to children as soon as they are diagnosed will limit the amount of damage the disease causes, mean less hospital admissions, tests and procedures, plus shorten the length of time spent by doctors trying different medications, many of which have serious side effects that could in turn lead to hospital treatment being required.  All these things would suggest that early treatment is absolutely cost effective.

The other articles are all pretty similar but I’ll link to them anyway: The Independant Health News and The Liverpool Daily Post; the sixth one was very basic so I’ll leave that out.

All of this is extremely good news for Still’s patients, whatever their age.

L

Ps. To see why the terms Still’s Disease and sJIA appear to be interchangable in this article, please read my earlier post ‘Confused About Still’s Disease?‘  This interchangability causes much confusion.

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