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Posts Tagged ‘Gastritis Diet’

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Things on the gastric side were looking up. I got the results back from yesterday’s Endoscopy and they showed that I had Gastritis – significant inflammation of the Oesophageal tract (which also explains the widespread chest pain), Stomach lining and Duodenum; not nice, but better than the ulceration that I had been concerned about.  Fortunately, all the IV medications I had been taking since being admitted were helping already – a combination of  Anti-Emmetics, (which close the top of the stomach and encourage things to flow in the right direction, as well as helping with nausea), Proton Pump Inhibitors, Antacids and H2 Blockers.

I still had some pain, but was told that it would take time for this to settle down as the inflammation eased. A nutritionist advised me to alter my diet and cut out certain irritant foods for a while; mainly spice and acidic foods such as tomatoes, peppers, onions, cheese, fruits and juices – all of my favourite things basically. Instead I was to eat lots of potatoes, white meat and fish, pasta, rice and vegetables, also things I already eat a lot of so no problem there. Hopefully, these limitations won’t be forever though as I’m a big foodie and like variety! Their guidelines said a strict diet for 4 – 6 weeks, after which I can start trying myself out with things a little bit at a time to see how I go… well except for spicy food, that’s going to take a lot longer and I love my spicy food 😦

They also stopped my Naproxen and Cyclosporin as they felt that these two drugs in particular had contributed to the Gastritis. I should mention that they did liase with my Rheumatology team throughout my stay and that they felt it was more likely to be the Methotrexate that I stopped recently. But, I was under the care of Southport Hospital and respected their wishes for the time being.

Things didn’t stop here though and another problem soon arose. As time progressed, I started to notice that the dreaded temperatures and sweats were increasing, plus I was starting to develop a very visible Still’s rash all over my body. I tried to show it to the nurses and doctor, to explain the significance of it and what usually followed, but I had been admitted with gastric problems and they were their only concern. It turns out that the two were connected though and that I potentially hadn’t been absorbing my oral medication for a month or so, leading to the major flare that follows.

As today went on, I became less mobile and able. I felt the pain and stiffness sneak into my joints; first making it difficult to reach for and hold things; next I began to struggle to sit and stand without help and then even hobbling the short distance to the toilet became a huge effort. By evening I was in a pretty bad way. A nurse finally listened to me and gave me the IV morphine I’d been prescribed to cover all of my pain whilst off oral meds; I wasn’t expecting any visitors and so fell asleep for a few hours – big mistake!

I woke up from my nap with all joints a-throbbing and found it impossible to even lift my head up, never mind sit up fully. This happens to me quite often, especially if I lie flat on my back for a time – I don’t know if it is simply part of the Still’s Disease or some throwback from the Dermatomyositis (a form of muscular dystrophy) I was diagnosed with at 14, but it has always been a big issue for me.  I buzzed the nurses to explain and was told that myself and another lady were being moved to another ward shortly and that they would sort me out there. Ironically, we were going to the ‘upwardly mobile’ ward, just at a time when I felt anything but mobile.

The problem about switching wards is that you have to make the staff aware of your problems all over again. It was obvious that they weren’t expecting a patient that had to be transported on a bed and pat-slided (a word I came to dread over the next week); this was a ward you were sent to  recover and prepare to be discharged. The two female nurses were lovely to me as I explained my difficulties and promised to find me pain relief and assistance; however, it turned out that they weren’t fully responsible for my care. It would be a male nurse called Conrad that would make all the decisions.

The first decision he made was to keep me rolled onto my left side, with pillows propped along my back so that I couldn’t roll flat. This was because he’d read in my notes that I was feeling nauseous and didn’t want me to choke if I was sick while lying on my back. Yes, I can see the line of thinking here, but I was no longer vomiting or even feeling sickly. The next decision he made was that I looked ‘too young’ to need any form of pain relief stronger than Paracetamol; I heard him say so at the nurses’ desk, which was a stone’s throw from my bed. When I told him I’d been on longterm pain medication for 16 years and that I knew Paracetamol wouldn’t help, he told me that it was ‘stronger than everyone thought’ and to ‘trust me, it’ll do the trick’.

It didn’t.

An hour or so later, I was in tears with the pain but he would not budge on the matter, even though I had actually been prescribed IV morphine and Oramorph by a doctor. I remember thinking it strange that my main pain seemed to be coming from my ‘good’ hip, but then I had been lying on it for over twelve hours by this point. I had no idea then just how bad things would get.

The night went on and the pain grew worse, but I must have managed to fall asleep at some point because I woke at the start of a nightmare the next morning.

L

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